AP 3 - 2022 - 200-2

Sligo’s Noble Six

17 September 2022

By mid-September 1922 the Republican forces were on the retreat throughout Ireland and were reverting to rural guerrilla tactics while the Free State controlled the cities and towns. Free article

Free State atrocities begin in Dublin

23 August 2022

The day after Michael Collins was shot, Richard Mulcahy, Chief of Staff of the Free State Army, sent a message to his soldiers. He urged them to “stand calmly by your posts” and said: “Let no cruel act of reprisal blemish your bright honour.” Yet in Dublin, within days of that message, and as the body of Michael Collins lay in state in City Hall, Free State forces carried out atrocities which up to recent times were largely forgotten. Free article

The tragedy of Michael Collins

18 August 2022

We are seeing a deluge of media coverage on the centenary of the death of Michael Collins. This is natural for such a towering figure in our history. It is unfortunate, though, that so much that is said and written about the Treaty and the Civil War is dominated by the figures of Collins and Dev, often to the exclusion of other key figures and usually glossing over the political issues involved. Free article

Arthur Griffith - a reflection

12 August 2022

Arthur Griffith died 100 years ago as the Civil War escalated, a war brought about as a direct result of his decision to sign the Treaty. Griffith’s legacy will forever be defined by that one act. Free article

Arthur Griffith: 31 March 1871 – 12 August 1922

12 August 2022

Arthur Joseph Griffith was born at 61 Upper Dominick Street, Dublin, son of Arthur Charles Griffith, printer, and Mary Whelan. He attended the local Christian Brothers school and began work as an office boy in Franklin Printing at 13. He was a voracious reader and studied for the rest of his years. He was deeply interested in Irish history, culture and language and was a member from his teens of many clubs such as Young Ireland League, the Celtic Literary Society and Conradh na Gaeilge (the Gaelic League). Free article

Execution of Reginald Dunne and Joseph O’Sullivan 100 years ago

10 August 2022

Often in history, and in politics, plans are overtaken by events. This could be said of the execution by two IRA Volunteers of Henry Wilson, the British military advisor to James Craig's Stormont parliament in 1922. Shot dead on the steps of his home, his death has been associated with the Free State's decision to attack the republican garrison in the Four Courts, thus setting the Civil War in train in earnest. Free article

Harry Boland

31 July 2022

The death of Harry Boland, coming less than a month after that of Cathal Brugha, was a major blow to the Republican cause. He was fatally wounded in Skerries, Co. Dublin, 100 years ago and died in hospital on 1 August 1922. Free article

Centenary of the death of Cathal Brugha

5 July 2022

ONE of the first leaders of the Irish people to lose his life in the Civil War in 1922 was Cathal Brugha TD who for many years had been a key figure in the IRA, Sinn Féin and Conradh na Gaeilge. Free article

Tragic Cushendall executions remembered a century on

4 July 2022

Republicans in Antrim recently marked the centenaries of volunteers killed in Cushendall and Glenariffe. Sinn Féin MLA Pat Sheehan was the speaker and told those assembled that the executed volunteers and “all their comrades 100 years ago opposed the undemocratic, unjust, and sectarian partitioning of our country”. Free article

Borrowed British guns

25 June 2022

The threat of renewed war made by the British government at the end of the Treaty negotiations was finally carried out on 28 June 1922 but it was the Provisional Government of the Free State that started the threatened war using borrowed British guns. Free article

Bodenstown 1922

18 June 2022

This Sunday 19 June 2022 Irish Republicans gather at Wolfe Tone’s grave at Bodenstown as we we have done for many decades. Almost exactly 100 years ago on Tuesday 20 June 1922 Republicans were at Bodenstown just a few days before the Civil War began with the Free State bombardment of the Four Courts. Free article

June 1922 - the Pact, the Election and British pressure for Civil War

13 June 2022

Since the narrow Dáil vote for the Treaty in January 1922 and the split in the IRA in March, there were ongoing efforts to prevent civil war and to find a basis for unity on both a political and military basis. Free article

Centenary of the Special Powers Act 1922

19 May 2022

The Special Powers Act, one of the most repressive pieces of legislation ever enacted anywhere, was extensively used for 50 years by the Unionist regime in the Six Counties. Free article

IRA occupation of the Four Courts

14 April 2022

100 years ago on 14 April 1922 the anti-Treaty IRA occupied the Four Courts in the centre of Dublin. The pro-Treaty Free State Army, then being built up, had already occupied evacuated British Army barracks in the capital, including Beggars Bush which they made their headquarters. Free article

The mandate that never was

7 April 2022

It has long been argued that the General Election of June 1922 was a ringing endorsement by voters in the 26 Counties for the Treaty and the Free State. But was that really the case, and did the election give the Free State government what it later claimed as a mandate to forcibly suppress their Republican opponents? Free article

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