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26 November 2009 Edition

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Basque youth activist speaks out against repression

MEMBERS of the Basque pro-independence youth organisation, Segi, visited Belfast from 13 to 15 November for the Ógra Shinn Féin National Congress.
One of the Segi representatives spoke to An Phoblacht about the criminalisation of the pro-independence movement by the Spanish Government, the recent Batasuna call for a democratic resolution to the Basque conflict, and the need to build solidarity between the Basque and Irish movements for independence.
Segi has been banned by the Spanish Government so the interviewee has to remain anonymous.

 

“AS Ógra Shinn Féin celebrates 100 years of the Irish republican youth movement since the foundation of Na Fianna Éireann, we in Segi are celebrating 30 years since the formation of our predecessor organisation, Jarrai,” the Segi representative told An Phoblacht.
“Segi is a revolutionary socialist, feminist, pro-independence youth organisation.
“We organise young people across the Basque Country in struggles for their rights – for national rights and language and cultural rights but also to improve their living conditions, housing and their rights in the workplace or on student campus.
“But while we celebrate three decades of struggle for Basque independence and socialism, our movement is coming under increasing repression.”
Segi (formerly Haika) was declared illegal in 2005 by the Audiencia Nacional (National Court, a Diplock-style political court in Madrid).
The court ruled that while it was an “unauthorised” organisation, it could not be considered “terrorist” because it had no connection to political violence. But in 2007 the Spanish Supreme Court revised the ruling – despite there being no new evidence  – and declared Jarrai-Haika-Segi to be a terrorist organisation.
“Now more than 100 of our comrades are in prison,” the Segi woman said.
“Now you can be jailed for eight years simply for membership of our organisation.
“The repression by the Spanish state against the youth movement consists not only  of arrests and imprisonment, although these are its most obvious forms. The criminalisation goes much deeper and broader; it is structural.
“There are continual attacks against youth centres, youth demonstrations and gatherings. They are targeting not just pro-independence activists but all community activists who provide leadership to strengthen their communities.”
The representative said that this year judgements have begun being handed down by the Spanish courts against Segi activists.
“Many have been held in ‘pre-trial detention’ since 2005 – four years being the maximum amount of time a person can be jailed before trial under Spanish law. The average sentence most young activists are receiving for their political activism is six years in jail,” she said.
“You can see the impact of the criminalisation campaign here in Belfast where Basque youth activist Arturo Beñat Villanueva is fighting extradition to Spain charged with membership of the youth movement.
“Each time a Basque political activist is arrested, the police come in the early hours of the morning and hold the person in incommunicado detention for five days, during which they are interrogated and often tortured.
“In many cases, police have forced the prisoners to sign statements saying they are members of a banned organisation and judges will use these statements to convict the prisoners, even if it is the only ‘proof’ offered by the prosecution.”
The activist said Segi “reaffirms its full support” for the proposal by Batasuna for a democratic resolution to the Basque conflict through a process in which the Basque people’s rights are recognised.
“This initiative is very significant and is the outcome of a process of discussion, consideration and reflection among the broad Basque pro-independence movement,” she said.
“As the initiative for peace and democracy was due to be announced in October, 10 leading Basque pro-independence activists were arrested and five of them remain in jail, including Batasuna spokesperson Arnaldo Otegi.
“The Spanish Government clearly fears such an initiative that would pave the way for a democratic resolution to the Basque question.
She said that as well as introducing legislation to criminalise all expressions of political support for Basque self-determination, the Spanish government was engaged in a “dirty war” of targeting political activists.
“Former prisoner and ETA volunteer Jon Anza disappeared in April this year,” she explained.  “We believe Jon, who was ill at the time, was kidnapped and killed during the course of an illegal interrogation by the Spanish security forces and his body buried in France.
“Several activists have been kidnapped, interrogated and beaten by security forces throughout the year as the Spanish government steps up its efforts to intimidate the movement and to recruit collaborators.”
The Segi activist said that the loss of control by the PNV (conservative Basque Nationalist Party) of the parliament of the Basque Autonomous Community in elections in March (which the left-nationalists were prohibited from participating in) showed the true nature of the so-called “autonomy” that had been granted to the Basque Autonomous Community after the death of fascist dictator General Franco in 1975.
The two main Spanish parties, the ruling PSOE (Socialist Party) and the conservative opposition Popular Party, formed an alliance to oust the nationalists from power after the election in March this year in which more than 100,000 Basques were disenfranchised as the parties they supported were banned.
“When Franco died and the Spanish Constitution was introduced, the PNV helped blind people to the fact that what was on offer was not self-determination for the Basque people but an attempt to divide us and have the Basques assimilate into the Spanish state,” she said.
“We can see 30 years later the impact of this strategy – in combination with repression and disenfranchisement – when the same parties that rule in Madrid are in power in the supposedly autonomous Basque parliament. There is no autonomy, only assimilation.
“The repression has certainly intensified since the PNV lost power. Over the summer, almost 1,000 people were arrested under the charge of ‘glorifying terrorism’ for displaying photographs of the 740 Basque political prisoners in Spanish and French jails.”
The Segi activist said she believed “the best answer to these attacks is to develop the initiative proposed by Batasuna, to build the conditions in which the Spanish state forces feel pressured to sit down and have the discussion about the Basque nation’s rights that needs to be had”.
She said the Segi delegation was proud to participate in Ógra’s centenary celebrations as the Basque youth movement was celebrating its 30-year anniversary of struggling for independence and socialism.
“Our organisations share the same goals and have many similar experiences,” she said.
“At the moment, although we share the same objectives, we are working in different conditions and it is very important to develop links of solidarity between our sister organisations.  Over the years, Jarrai-Haika-Segi have sent many representatives to Ireland, and many Ógra activists have visited Euskal Herria.
“We have much to learn from each other and these links of solidarity enrich the struggle, experience and knowledge of both organisations.
“Segi views the progress of the Irish Republican Movement in advancing national and democratic rights as a reference, a model, and as a source of hope and inspiration for our struggle.”

An Phoblacht Magazine

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