13 December 2007 Edition

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Mála Poist

Cuireann An Phoblacht fáilte roimh litreacha ónár léitheoirí. Scríobh i nGaeilge nó i mBéarla, 200 focal ar a méid. Déantar giorrú ar litreachta más gá. Cuir do litir chuig [email protected]
An Phoblacht welcomes readers’ letters. Write in Irish or English, 200 words maximum. Letters may be edited for brevity. Send your letters to [email protected] No attachments please

Katy French and cocaine

A chara,
THE weekend newspapers and radio talk shows were full of the tragic death of model and ‘IT girl’ Katy French, suspected of dying from cocaine. Some spoke of teenagers weeping openly in newsagents as they read of the story of affluent Ireland’s icon.
However, there was barely a mention of the two young Waterford men who died from cocaine at a party, Kevin Doyle and John Grey. Undoubtedly, it was because, in the eyes of the media, they are ‘ordinary’ – nobodies in news terms.
Says it all about the shallowness of the debate about Katy French and the scourge of cocaine in ‘ordinary’ communities, doesn’t it?
JOHN LUCAS,
Rathmines,
Dublin 6.

A chara,
THE recent tragic death of young Irish model Katy French has highlighted all that is wrong with post-Celtic Tiger Ireland.
The past few years have seen a warped value system promoted by the Irish business, media and political establishments. The debased culture that has emerged in this ‘modern’ Ireland defines success in the shallow terms of materialism, fame for the sake of fame, individualism and loud-mouth, second-hand opinions by ubiquitous ‘know nothings’ in the media. The country is awash with cocaine, the drug of choice for the generation spawned by this dysfunctional society.
If ‘modern’ Ireland were a person it would be a vulgar adolescent who has been given far too much pocket money by neglectful parents to replace real love and attention.
Is it any wonder that the values of social solidarity, patriotism, respect for the elderly, good neighbourliness, dignity and self-sacrifice have been abandoned by many? Those who have shaped the economy and society here promote private health insurance over universal public healthcare, the idea of houses as commodities over the right to a home for everyone, individual car ownership over proper public transport, and consumption over citizenship.
While she lived, Katy French, the celebrity model, was promoted as a representative image of the new, young, trendy, ‘modern’ Ireland. I have to say that her awful death from a suspected cocaine overdose is an image that more truly represents the society that has been created in the 26 Counties in recent years.
To cure the symptoms of this malaise requires tackling the cause. The last general election was won by those who exploited a fear of jeapordising the new-found wealth in this country. The next election will be about the best vision for a new and genuinely modern, and grown-up Ireland. Ireland needs to see implemented, now more than ever, the values of genuine republicanism – community cohesion, national self-respect and social justice.
SEÓSAIMH
Ó TUATHAIL,
Baile Átha Cliath 3.

 

Congratulations, Club Rio

A chara,
SINN FÉIN councillors in County Wexford congratulate Club Rio on their wonderful achievement in creating a new ballroom and Latin dance record and earning a place in The Guinness Book of Records.
The team consisted of Mark Cooke, Samantha Crofts, Katie Crofts, Andrea Oleary, John Walsh and Alan Obrien.
The new world record is 53.5 hours. All the money raised was donated to the Children in Need appeal. Well done to everyone concerned.
Councillor Maurice Roche
(Wexford County Council)
Councillor Anthony Kelly
(Wexford Borough Council)
Councillor John Dwyer
(Wexford County Council and
New Ross Town Council)
Councillor
Noirín Sheridan
(Enniscorthy Town Council)

Agency workers

A chara,
YOU can always depend on the powerful institutions and their allies to ensure that workers cannot get what they are due.
This was clearly seen when the Irish Government aligned itself with the British Government and put a stop to the EU directive that would have allowed temporary workers the same rights as the rest of us. This did not suit your Fianna Fáil/PD/Green Government as it would have cost the employers money. Pity about them, I say.
This whole issue again highlights why I will be voting ‘No’ when the EU referendum comes around next year.
PAUL DORAN,
Clondalkin,
Dublin 22.


An Phoblacht
44 Parnell Sq.
Dublin 1
Ireland
 

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