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Partitionist states established

2 December 2012

FOUR DAYS in December 1922 saw tragic events that were the working out of the British Government’s plan to divide and rule Ireland. Partition had been legislated for under the 1920 Government of Ireland Act. At the time of its passing, that Act was a dead letter throughout most of the country, where the Republic had the allegiance of the majority of the people. But in north-east Ulster, the Act led to the establishment of a sectarian Orange state. Partition and the creation of a Six-County state were confirmed in the Treaty that now divided nationalist Ireland. Free article

Irish Bulletin republished

2 December 2012

FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, the official newspaper of Dáil Éireann, the Irish Bulletin, has been republished. This is a hugely important historical document, chronicling many of the events of the Black and Tan War. Premium service article

Martin McGuinness: ‘A united Ireland is inevitable’

4 November 2012

AN PHOBLACHT last interviewed MARTIN McGUINNESS during his election campaign for President of Ireland. One year on – after coming a very creditable third of seven candidates and winning twice as many votes as Fine Gael’s Gay Mitchell – Martin spoke to us about the political state of play. Free article

Ulster Protestants against Carsonism

4 November 2012

BY THE END OF 1913, the campaign against Home Rule for Ireland organised by the Ulster Unionists and their allies in the Conservative and Unionist Party — better known as the Tories — in Britain had reached a crescendo. The Ulster Volunteers had been established as well as a ‘Provisional Government’, which threatened to seize power if Home Rule became law. Free article

Unionism’s private army

30 September 2012

IN the final part of his series of articles around unionist centenaries, TOM HARTLEY looks at the origins of the Ulster Volunteer Force – the UVF. Free article

From the Archives: One woman’s war

2 September 2012

THE collection of witness statements from the revolutionary years 1913-1921 in the Bureau of Military History in Dublin (www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie) was last month made available online for the first time. There are 36,000 pages of testimony from hundreds of witnesses, mostly members of the IRA, Cumann na mBan, Sinn Féin, the IRB and Fianna Éireann. It is an historical treasure trove. The site is fully searchable and is of special value to those researching the local history of the period. Here are excerpts from the testimony of one woman, Catherine Byrne (married name Rooney), from 17 North Richmond Street, next to Croke Park in Dublin’s north inner city. She was one of the most active members of Cumann na mBan. The family home was regularly used by the IRA during the Black and Tan War, including by the Dublin Active Service Unit, better known as ‘The Squad’. Free article

Gerrymandering electoral boundaries

2 September 2012

MY FATHER, born in 1904, was a member of a Falls Road republican family. The family saw themselves as belonging to a national political majority. But my father’s status in belonging to this majority changed overnight, on 23 December 1920, as a result of the Government of Ireland Act. Free article

Underlining partition

29 July 2012

FOLLOWING the review of unionist and Orange volunteers at Balmoral in Belfast on 9 April 1912 (Easter Tuesday) by Edward Carson and Bonar Law, leader of the Conservative Party, the unionist leadership began to think of an oath of loyalty to the unionist cause that would strengthen unionist opposition to home rule. In a conversation between James Craig MP (a senior member of the unionist leadership) and BWD Montgomery (Secretary of the Ulster Club in Belfast), Montgomery suggested using the Scottish 1643 Solemn League and Covenant as a model for their oath. Thomas Sinclair, a leading member of the Ulster Unionist Council, was then given the task of writing the first draft. Prior to its adoption by the Ulster Unionist Council, the final draft of the Covenant was submitted to the Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregational churches and the Church of Ireland for their consent and approval. Premium service article

Cathal Brugha

2 July 2012

ONE of the first leaders of the Irish people to lose his life in the Civil War in 1922 was Cathal Brugha TD who for many years had been a key figure in the IRA, Sinn Féin and Conradh na Gaeilge. Free article

1912: A Year to Remember

25 May 2012

IF A RANDOM SAMPLE of Belfast people was asked to name the most important event of 1912, it is highly likely that the majority of them would cite the sinking of the RMS Titanic. This is partly a consequence of the present saturation coverage of Titanic commemorations and partly a pre-existing, enduring interest in the story of the doomed vessel, the most famous ship in modern-day history. Free article

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Sinn Féin Bookshop

58 Parnell Square, Dublin 1, Ireland.

Phone: (00 353 1) 8148542

www.sinnfeinbookshop.com

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Bulk orders available 

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Fascinating insights into

Irish revolutionary history now online

Every week over the next two years, An Phoblacht is making all the editions of The Irish Volunteer – the newspaper of the Irish Volunteer movement – available online exactly 100 years after they were first published

The Irish Volunteer — tOglách na hÉireann was first published on 7 February 1914 and every week until 22 April 1916, just days before the Easter Rising.

Acting as the official newspaper of the Irish Volunteers it outlined the political views of the leadership and reported on the and important events, such as the Howth Gun Running of 1914.

Included in its pages alongside political opinions and news reports are various advertisements for such items as revolvers, bandoliers and military uniforms from stockists across Ireland.

You can now read these fascinating insights into Irish revolutionary history with an online subscription to An Phoblacht for just €10 per year. This includes a digital copy of each new edition of the paper and Iris magazine, access to our digitised historic archives as well as copies of The Irish Volunteer.


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